Branding Speaker, Trainer, and Coach

Using Accents to Boost Your Brand

 

OMG! I couldn’t stop laughing at 2 of the most fun commercials out there lately:

The Hopper by Dish

Airport for Lindt Truffles with tennis player, Roger Federer

Both of these commercials work because they take an expected cliché of accents and turn a negative into a humorous positive. For Dish, the often-spoofed Boston pronunciation makes for a compelling and unforgettable commercial. And, everyone who knows anyone from that town can relate – and laugh!

In the case of the second ad, tennis champion Fed must navigate through security, but uh-oh, finds that his stash of chocolate (Swiss, naturally!), has to be confiscated.

What’s the lesson here? If you are hiding behind your Southern drawl, Spanish accent, or French lilt, now’s the time to embrace your trademark trait! Great brands don’t blend in, they brand out! So, stop apologizing for the way you speak and celebrate that it is just another item that makes you unique! Entiendes?

 

I welcome your comments!

5 Comments
  1. Liz, thank you for sharing your branding highlight scenarios that I otherwise would have never considered. And this Lizdom is too funny. Thanks for the lesson and the laugh!

  2. Liz: Right on! And I’ve said it before and will say it again–FUNNY MEANS MONEY! These folks make their brand even more memorable (thus profitable) because they’ve connected it with humor.
    (FYI in Boston–Hoppah is also word used for toilet–unintended humor???)
    Yours in laughter!
    Karyn

  3. Liz, that’s too funny. Did you notice the stealthy placement of the mug with a kangaroo on it, on the coffee table? I’ll remember to ham up my accent whenever I can!
    Maaaaarvelous!
    And the Federer commercial leaves us wanting more…of him, more than the chocolate! Another good thing for future viewings.
    🙂

  4. Liz, i am an immigrant From Russia. I’ve been in North America for 16 years. First couple of years I was always uncomfortable when people didn’t understand my accent, then I switched to humorous approach: “My name is Maria Serbina. I have Russian accent, people. Please open your ears and listen, otherwise go and wash them.” I tried it first time when I was standing in front of 9th graders in my youngest daughter geography class. All of them started laughing after my short intro.

    • Thanks, Maria for sharing.

      I see your “intro” as a 7-second hook; it works!

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